Posts tagged shark finning

Posted 9 months ago
SHARK EXPERTS SAY “NO” TO CULL!

Sharks have been around for millions of years. Now many species are extinct due to the Shark Finning industry, sport fishing, long lining, trawling, over fishing of oceans etc

Get real Australians, the Cull is bullshit. Sharks never come on land to hunt and eat us. If you want to swim in their territory and splash around like an injured seal then that’s your problem not their’s. Idiots!!!

Reporthttp://www.supportoursharks.com/en/News/Miscellaneous/Articles/20131223/Shark_Experts_Oppose_WA_Shark_Cull_Policy.htm

SHARK EXPERTS SAY “NO” TO CULL!

Sharks have been around for millions of years. Now many species are extinct due to the Shark Finning industry, sport fishing, long lining, trawling, over fishing of oceans etc

Get real Australians, the Cull is bullshit. Sharks never come on land to hunt and eat us. If you want to swim in their territory and splash around like an injured seal then that’s your problem not their’s. Idiots!!!

Report
http://www.supportoursharks.com/en/News/Miscellaneous/Articles/20131223/Shark_Experts_Oppose_WA_Shark_Cull_Policy.htm

Posted 1 year ago
DID YOU KNOW?  The ocean gets it saltiness from the tears of misunderstood #Sharks who just want to cuddle!

DID YOU KNOW? The ocean gets it saltiness from the tears of misunderstood #Sharks who just want to cuddle!

Posted 2 years ago
The din over shark fin

CHINA says it will ban shark fin soup from official banquets in three years, and despite the vast popularity of the dish, there are signs that a growing number of people are turning down the delicacy symbolizing prestige and generosity. Dong Zhen reports.The image of bloodied, dying sharks with sawed-off fins and the realization that the shark population is plummeting have mobilized people to save the sharks and remove status-symbol shark fin soup from Chinese menus.A no-shark-fin campaign is growing across China, the world’s major consumer of the fins. Celebrities and business people are calling on the Chinese to forego the delicacies. They include former NBA star Yao Ming, filmmaker Ang Lee and 300 business tycoons, including Jack Ma, owner of Alibaba.com and Taobao.com, and Wang Shi, who owns Vanke, one of the largest real estate groups in China."When the buying stops, the killing can too," Yao says in a widely seen video. 

click photo for full story

The din over shark fin

CHINA says it will ban shark fin soup from official banquets in three years, and despite the vast popularity of the dish, there are signs that a growing number of people are turning down the delicacy symbolizing prestige and generosity. Dong Zhen reports.

The image of bloodied, dying sharks with sawed-off fins and the realization that the shark population is plummeting have mobilized people to save the sharks and remove status-symbol shark fin soup from Chinese menus.

A no-shark-fin campaign is growing across China, the world’s major consumer of the fins. Celebrities and business people are calling on the Chinese to forego the delicacies. They include former NBA star Yao Ming, filmmaker Ang Lee and 300 business tycoons, including Jack Ma, owner of Alibaba.com and Taobao.com, and Wang Shi, who owns Vanke, one of the largest real estate groups in China.

"When the buying stops, the killing can too," Yao says in a widely seen video. 


click photo for full story

Posted 2 years ago

THE TRUTH:-
How had mankind gone so far off the track, engaging in such barbaric acts, willful cruelty and reckless destruction? Nature has given us so many incredible gifts, but rather than cherish and protect them, we have set out to systematically eradicate them.

READ “THE DARK ROOM”
Warning – The following contains imagery that depicts the hard truth.

Click photo please!

Posted 2 years ago
SAY “NO” TO SHARK FIN SOUP. TAKE THE PLEDGE TODAY!

Research indicates that worldwide shark numbers have plummeted by as much as 90% in recent decades, largely attributable to shark finning. It is estimated that an astonishing 100 million sharks are killed specifically for their fins each year.

Please Read “Shark fin soup: A recipe for extinction ”

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/media/opinion.php?op=152

SAY “NO” TO SHARK FIN SOUP. TAKE THE PLEDGE TODAY!

Research indicates that worldwide shark numbers have plummeted by as much as 90% in recent decades, largely attributable to shark finning. It is estimated that an astonishing 100 million sharks are killed specifically for their fins each year.

Please Read “Shark fin soup: A recipe for extinction ”

http://www.animalsaustralia.org/media/opinion.php?op=152

Posted 2 years ago

New Shark-Fin Pictures Reveal Ocean “Strip Mining”


Workers at a Taiwanese fishing port clean and process a haul of shark fins in new pictures taken by the U.S.-based Pew Environment Group.

Released October 19, the images show fins and body parts of vulnerable shark species—including the scalloped hammerhead and oceanic whitetip—being prepared for sale.

Up to 73 million sharks are caught each year for the global fin trade, which fuels a demand for shark-fin soup, according to Pew. Fishers usually slice the animals’ fins off and throw their still-living bodies overboard.

Click photo for more

Posted 2 years ago

THE SCUM OF THE EARTH ALWAYS FIND A WAY TO MURDER THE INNOCENT!

With only spines attached, shark fins come ashore.

Foreign fishing ships are bringing in shark skeletons – the flesh shaved away – with just their fins attached to the body. Local fishermen see this as another way that fishing fleets are evading shark finning laws.

Despite recent measures to crack down on the practice of shark finning, Costa Rican fishermen and environmentalists believe that foreign fleets are once again using methods to evade Costa Rican fishing laws and regulations.

In recent months, three Taiwanese ships landed shark fins attached only to the shark’s spine at the public dock in Puntarenas. The sharks’ flesh was shaved away from the sharks’ spines, leaving only skeletons attached to full fins.


Click photo to read article please

Posted 2 years ago
State plan to add tiger and hammerhead sharks to protected list divides anglers

After listening to the tales of fishermen, researchers and conservationists about the plight of the tiger and hammerhead sharks, officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are drafting a rule that would make it a crime to kill the sharks.

After listening to the tales of fishermen, researchers and conservationists about the plight of the tiger and hammerhead sharks, officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are drafting a rule that would make it a crime to kill the sharks.

Although 22 species of sharks are protected in Florida waters, wildlife officials concluded that the tiger shark and three species of the hammerhead also need protection from recreational anglers who catch the predators for sport and from commercial fishermen who harvest sharks for their highly valued fins, used for shark fin soup, and for shark livers, used in vitamins.

"When the top predators are healthy, we have a healthy ecosystem," said Aaron Podey, a fishery management analyst with the FWC. "I think people are realizing this more and more."

If the proposal is approved, killing one of these newly protected sharks will be a second-degree misdemeanor, punishable by up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine.

But the proposal has angered some anglers who dispute the data used to assess shark populations. They contend that the FWC is merely kowtowing to the anti-fishing agenda of animal rights activists.

"It’s ‘eco’ this and ‘eco’ that," said captain Bill Goldschmitt, a former commercial shark fisherman and author of Sharkman of Cortez. Goldschmitt, who now hosts a shark tournament, says sharks "are so thick" that some contestants easily meet the one-shark-per-day limit during his five-week tournaments. This year’s event begins Oct. 28.

"This tournament isn’t about trophies or prize money," Goldschmitt explains on the tournament registration form. "It’s about an outdoorsman’s freedom to fish."

The proposed rule would not end shark tournaments, as long as caught sharks are released alive. The Guy Harvey Ultimate Shark Challenge and Festival in Punta Gorda in May required each boat to have an observer, trained by researchers at the Mote Marine Center for Shark Research.

Contestants also were required to use heavy conventional tackle to reduce the time between hookup and release of all animals, and nonstainless steel circle hooks to avoid the internal hooking of sharks. To prevent more trauma to the shark, the animals were measured in the water using a custom device provided by tournament organizers. Many of the sharks were tagged with satellite-linked transmitters to track their movements after release.

The FWC also is considering a trophy tag program, similar to the program used for tarpon. A limited number of tags would be sold, and anglers with tags would be allowed to catch and kill one of the newly protected sharks. The FWC also is developing an educational campaign to encourage the use of circle hooks, which are less likely to get caught in a shark’s gut, and tips for safe-release techniques.

Florida’s state waters, which extend 3 miles off the Atlantic coast and 9 miles off the Gulf coast, are home to several species of sharks. Many use the state’s coastal waters as nursery grounds for their pups. Sharks typically move inshore and north in the spring and summer and offshore and south in the fall and winter.

Statistically, humans pose a much greater danger to sharks than sharks do to humans.

On average, fewer than 10 people die worldwide from shark attacks every year. In Florida, 1 percent of shark attacks are fatal. Fisheries around the world kill an estimated 100 million sharks annually, according to the FWC.

In local waters, one dive boat captain has noticed a dramatic drop in shark sightings when commercial shark fishing begins every summer. Van Blakeman said he saw eight dead tiger sharks and one large hammerhead laid out on a dock at a local marina this summer, waiting for commercial fishermen to cut off their fins.

"This is not a renewable resource, and at this time, we can’t quota-hunt them," said Blakeman, who described seeing a tiger shark on a dive as a "wonderful experience."

"We need to back off and stand up for these animals," he said.

State plan to add tiger and hammerhead sharks to protected list divides anglers

After listening to the tales of fishermen, researchers and conservationists about the plight of the tiger and hammerhead sharks, officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are drafting a rule that would make it a crime to kill the sharks.

After listening to the tales of fishermen, researchers and conservationists about the plight of the tiger and hammerhead sharks, officials with the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission are drafting a rule that would make it a crime to kill the sharks.

Although 22 species of sharks are protected in Florida waters, wildlife officials concluded that the tiger shark and three species of the hammerhead also need protection from recreational anglers who catch the predators for sport and from commercial fishermen who harvest sharks for their highly valued fins, used for shark fin soup, and for shark livers, used in vitamins.

"When the top predators are healthy, we have a healthy ecosystem," said Aaron Podey, a fishery management analyst with the FWC. "I think people are realizing this more and more."

If the proposal is approved, killing one of these newly protected sharks will be a second-degree misdemeanor, punishable by up to 60 days in jail and a $500 fine.

But the proposal has angered some anglers who dispute the data used to assess shark populations. They contend that the FWC is merely kowtowing to the anti-fishing agenda of animal rights activists.

"It’s ‘eco’ this and ‘eco’ that," said captain Bill Goldschmitt, a former commercial shark fisherman and author of Sharkman of Cortez. Goldschmitt, who now hosts a shark tournament, says sharks "are so thick" that some contestants easily meet the one-shark-per-day limit during his five-week tournaments. This year’s event begins Oct. 28.

"This tournament isn’t about trophies or prize money," Goldschmitt explains on the tournament registration form. "It’s about an outdoorsman’s freedom to fish."

The proposed rule would not end shark tournaments, as long as caught sharks are released alive. The Guy Harvey Ultimate Shark Challenge and Festival in Punta Gorda in May required each boat to have an observer, trained by researchers at the Mote Marine Center for Shark Research.

Contestants also were required to use heavy conventional tackle to reduce the time between hookup and release of all animals, and nonstainless steel circle hooks to avoid the internal hooking of sharks. To prevent more trauma to the shark, the animals were measured in the water using a custom device provided by tournament organizers. Many of the sharks were tagged with satellite-linked transmitters to track their movements after release.

The FWC also is considering a trophy tag program, similar to the program used for tarpon. A limited number of tags would be sold, and anglers with tags would be allowed to catch and kill one of the newly protected sharks. The FWC also is developing an educational campaign to encourage the use of circle hooks, which are less likely to get caught in a shark’s gut, and tips for safe-release techniques.

Florida’s state waters, which extend 3 miles off the Atlantic coast and 9 miles off the Gulf coast, are home to several species of sharks. Many use the state’s coastal waters as nursery grounds for their pups. Sharks typically move inshore and north in the spring and summer and offshore and south in the fall and winter.

Statistically, humans pose a much greater danger to sharks than sharks do to humans.

On average, fewer than 10 people die worldwide from shark attacks every year. In Florida, 1 percent of shark attacks are fatal. Fisheries around the world kill an estimated 100 million sharks annually, according to the FWC.

In local waters, one dive boat captain has noticed a dramatic drop in shark sightings when commercial shark fishing begins every summer. Van Blakeman said he saw eight dead tiger sharks and one large hammerhead laid out on a dock at a local marina this summer, waiting for commercial fishermen to cut off their fins.

"This is not a renewable resource, and at this time, we can’t quota-hunt them," said Blakeman, who described seeing a tiger shark on a dive as a "wonderful experience."

"We need to back off and stand up for these animals," he said.

Posted 3 years ago

The Cutting Room Floor….  VIDEO: Inside a shark slaughterhouse in China..

The Star’s Bill Schiller obtained rare access to a factory where sharks are processed - largely for the use of their fins in a controversial dish regarded by some as a delicacy. 

PUQI, CHINA—They have roamed the seas for millions of years, survived the rise and fall of the dinosaurs.

But in China, sharks reach their final destination at the end of a road in a town called Puqi.

On the blood-slicked floors of Haideli Shark Products, the air heavy with the smell of ammonia, as many as 100 sharks per day arrive to be butchered and processed as food.

The most highly prized parts — the fins — are destined to become shark fin soup, the high-priced Asian delicacy.

But environmentalists say the growing appetite for the soup comes at a high price: a dangerous decline in shark numbers worldwide, upsetting the balance of the oceans.

That concern is spreading. Four U.S. states and three U.S. possessions have banned the sale and consumption of shark fin.

Next month, Toronto will consider a proposed ban. And in Ottawa, New Democrat MP Fin Donnelly wants a national ban.

Even in Hong Kong, which handles 50 per cent of the global trade in shark fin, there are signs of growing resistance to its consumption.

But here on China’s mainland — which together with Taiwan and Hong Kong consumes 95 per cent of the world’s shark fin — incomes are rising, and so is demand for the delicacy.

In a society where showing off one’s wealth matters, shark fin soup is a powerful status symbol. Buying it means you can afford it, and never before have so many come within reach.

A single bowl at a top Hong Kong restaurant, for example, can cost $200.

In specialty markets, whole fins can sell for $1,600 a kilogram — or more.

“Eating shark’s fin is a deeply rooted tradition, especially at weddings,” says Haideli’s Wang Haifeng, whose family has been in the shark processing business for three generations. “In China we say, ‘Without shark’s fin, it’s not a banquet.’ ”

For full story see The Saturday Star.


(Source: thestar.com)